biosecurity sign on fence.

The recent spread of African Swine Fever in China has elevated the importance of biosecurity measures in reducing the risk of a domestic or foreign animal disease entering farms. Iowa Pork Industry Center and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach are offering a no-cost workshop to help attendees learn about, develop and prioritize biosecurity practices. Read more about Biosecurity Workshop Series Planned for Iowa Pork Producers

Media contact:
Linda Geist
Writer
University of Missouri Extension
Phone: 573-882-9185
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Story source: Patricia Barrett, 573-369-2394

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Agricultural lenders know it is vital to stay current on trends.

University of Missouri Extension offers a workshop on “Financing Agriculture in Changing Times” in Jefferson City on Nov. 28.

It will be from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Lincoln University’s Carver Farm, 3804 Bald Hill Road, Jefferson City.

The seminar targets lenders who maintain or develop agriculture loan portfolios. Lenders receive the livestock and crop commodity outlooks for the coming year and hear updates on current farmland prices and rental rates.

Dean Volenberg, MU Extension viticulturist, tells about trends in the grape and wine industry. Extension economists Scott Brown and John Kruse give the livestock and grain outlooks. The USDA Farm Service Agency presents updates. Extension ag business specialist Patricia Barrett shares current land rental trends and extension natural resources specialist Sarah Havens offers insight on weather and timber values.

Register by Nov. 26. The $50 fee includes the seminar, lunch and a booklet. Make checks payable to University of Missouri Extension in Cole County and send to 2436 Tanner Bridge Road, Jefferson City, MO 65101.

For more information, call 573-634-2824 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

person holding fresh vegetables in a basket by HQUALITY/stock.adobe.com.

As the 2018 growing season comes to a close, fruit and vegetable growers across Iowa are asking themselves what they can do to improve their production techniques or to minimize the impact of pests next year. Many of these questions are answered in the November issue of the Small Farm Sustainability newsletter. Read more about Get Answers to Questions about Growing Common Fruits, Vegetables

Media contact:
Linda Geist
Writer
University of Missouri Extension
Phone: 573-882-9185
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Story source: Eldon Cole, 417-466-3102

JOPLIN, Mo. – Missouri beef herd owners learn profits and risks of sending their calves to a feedlot. They’ve entered 50 Missouri Steer Feedouts run by University of Missouri Extension.

To cut risks in learning, they enter samples of five to 20 head, said Eldon Cole, MU Extension livestock specialist. The Missouri Steer Feedout for winter-spring born calves began Nov. 6 at the Joplin Regional Stockyards in Carthage. The program teaches cow-calf farmers to keep a sampling of their steer calves through harvest.

The steers go to Tri-County Steer Carcass Futurity in southwestern Iowa. Throughout the process, their weight gain, feedlot performance and herd health are noted. The feedlot manages them until they are harvested by Tyson Foods in Nebraska in the spring.

Cole, from Mount Vernon, has done this since 1981 with lots of help. Over the years, 365 owners have entered 7,557 steers in the Missouri Steer Feedout. Participants come from Arkansas, Kansas, Illinois, Oklahoma and Missouri.

Producers enter a minimum of five steers. Most herds consign 10-20 head to allow them to compare sires.

MU Extension livestock specialists, Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association members, and employees of USDA and Missouri Department of Agriculture sorted, tagged, weighed, graded and priced 139 steers from 15 groups. They weighed an average of 639 pounds. An average set-in price of $151.73 will be used to calculate feedlot performance.

Farmers hear comments as a panel views the steers. The panel included Jodie Pitcock, USDA, St. Joseph; Dan Hill, Missouri Department of Agriculture, West Plains; Jackie Moore, Joplin Regional Stockyards; Matt Thompson, Crossroads Cattle Co., Columbia; Wes Spinks, order buyer, Jerico Springs; and Mark Harmon, Joplin Regional Stockyards. They discussed strengths and weaknesses of the steers, including frame, muscle score and body condition.

“The 15 lots of steers gave the audience a great chance to see the diversity of cattle in southwest Missouri,” says Cole. There were mostly Angus and Angus crosses. There were some Brahman crosses, straight Charolais and Red Angus. Body conditions ranged from 4 to 7. Calves were born late December to April.

Harmon gave tips on how to help the auctioneer get more bids on the cattle. Write down vaccination types and date and weaning dates on a recipe card to take to the auction barn, Harmon says. “Once you get information, put it to work,” Cole says.

Through the years, Missouri cattle producers learned “you can’t tell a steer’s post-weaning performance by its cover,” says Cole. “The only way you’ll learn your herd’s genetics for overall performance is to feed them at least two or three times.”

Cole says feedouts don’t guarantee more money. Since 1981, the average profit per head has been less than $50. The payoff comes when producers use results to adjust their genetics and management. Cole says most producers enter five to 15 head of cattle. This is a low-risk way to find strengths and weaknesses, he says. The program helps small herd owners gain data to improve their herd’s genetic reputation.

Cole urges participants to set reasonable goals and realize “there are lots of average cattle.” A goal is to have 70 to 80 percent of carcasses grade USDA choice or higher.

Steers are ranked on temperament when they are worked. Disposition matters. Graders also check for bad eyes, primarily pinkeye. Steers with eye problems generally weigh 34 pounds less at weaning and gain less in finishing.

Cole tells participants to track steer performance back to the sire and dam and use this data to market herd mates as feeders or breeding stock. He teaches producers about the feedlot and packer’s desired grid. Results should arrive in late May to early June.

Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association President Russell Marion of Pierce City has enrolled in the program the last 16 years. His profit per head averaged $39.96, ranging from $328 to minus $185. He also weighs calves and operates the chute at the feedout weigh-in.

Cole urged Marion to enter calves several years ago. “I wanted to see what they would do in the feedlot,” he says. “This is another whole segment of our industry.”

Marion says he uses the feedout to learn about his own herd. He usually brings oddly colored calves that would not bring as much money at a livestock auction. For feeding, hair color does not matter. Judges put emphasis on carcass grades and yield. Marion has a 400-head operation and 200 acres of hay. He rents his row crop acres.

For more information, contact any MU Extension livestock specialist in southwestern Missouri:

  • Eldon Cole, Mt. Vernon, 417-466-3102.
  • Andy McCorkill, Dallas County, 417-345-7551.
  • Patrick Davis, Cedar County, 417-276-3313.
  • Randall Wiedmeier, Ozark County, 417-679-3525.
  • Daniel Mallory, Ralls County, 573-985-3911.
  • Zac Erwin, Adair County, 660-665-9866.

Learn more at extension.missouri.edu/lawrence/documents/FOBrochure2018-19.pdf and www.swmobcia.com.

Photos available for this release:

https://extensiondata.missouri.edu/NewsAdmin/Photos/2018/msf162.jpg
Mount Vernon beef producer Steve Jones removed old tags and tagged steers with a number to help feedlot operators track each calf’s progress. He also brought two cattle of his own for the feedout. Photo by Linda Geist.

https://extensiondata.missouri.edu/NewsAdmin/Photos/2018/msf200.jpg
Steers in the Missouri Steer Feedout go through an extensive grading by, from left, MU Extension livestock specialist Eldon Cole; Dan Hill, Missouri Department of Agriculture; and Jodie Pitcock, USDA. Looking on is Gerald Eggerman, South Greenfield. Photo by Linda Geist.

Photos available for this release:

Photo

Cutline: Mount Vernon beef producer Steve Jones removed old tags and tagged steers with a number to help feedlot operators track each calf’s progress. He also brought two cattle of his own for the feedout.

Credit: Photo by Linda Geist

Photo

Cutline: Steers in the Missouri Steer Feedout go through an extensive grading by, from left, MU Extension livestock specialist Eldon Cole; Dan Hill, Missouri Department of Agriculture; and Jodie Pitcock, USDA. Looking on is Gerald Eggerman, South Greenfield.

Credit: Photo by Linda Geist

by Irene Shonle, Gilpin County If you didn’t see it, the Smithsonian Magazine recently highlighted a study which was just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences last month (Oct 2018) (http://www.pnas.org/content/115/45/11549).The Smithsonian’s headline was catchy:Ecologists have this simple request to homeowners:plant native.In it, they summarized

Media contact:
Curt Wohleber
Writer
University of Missouri Extension
Phone: 573-882-5409
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Story source: Londa Nwadike, 816-482-5860

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – You have probably heard it’s a bad idea to eat uncooked dough because it contains raw eggs. But raw flour can also make you sick, says Londa Nwadike, extension state food safety specialist for University of Missouri and Kansas State University

As the holiday season approaches, Nwadike urges people to resist the temptation to taste uncooked batter or dough, no matter how delicious it might be.

“Bacteria from animal waste and other sources can contaminate grain in fields or throughout the grain transportation and flour production system,” Nwadike says. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, flour from milled grain is typically not treated to kill bacteria.

“That means it’s not safe to eat until properly cooked,” she says.

You might have licked cake batter or cookie dough from spoons lots of times with no ill effects. But some haven’t been so lucky, Nwadike says.

In 2016, more than 60 people grew sick from E. coli bacteria linked to contaminated raw flour, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 10 million pounds of flour and flour-containing products were recalled, including bread, pastry and pancake mixes.

What about cookie dough ice cream? Nwadike says commercially purchased cookie dough ice cream should be safe because it contains heat-treated flour and pasteurized eggs. But that might not be true of store-bought cookie dough for baking. A 2009 outbreak traced to prepackaged raw cookie dough sickened 72 people; many of them were hospitalized.

“Bacteria have changed over the years, so they may be more likely to cause ill effects now than in the past,” Nwadike says.

The FDA offers safety tips when preparing cookies, pies, cakes and other foods containing flour:

• Don’t eat uncooked dough, batter or other foods containing raw flour.

• Be sure children don’t eat or taste dough used in crafts.

• Make sure foods containing flour are cooked to the proper temperature. Follow recipes or package directions.

• As with raw meat, keep raw flour or eggs separate from ready-to-eat foods.

• Clean bowls, utensils, countertops and other surfaces thoroughly after use. Wash hands often.

Sidebar: Suggested final internal product temperatures for baked goods

  • Layer cakes: 205-210 F
  • Pound cake: 210 F
  • Jellyroll cakes: 190-195 F
  • Muffins: 210 F
  • Quick bread: 210 F
  • Yeast bread: 195-210 F
  • Bundt cake: 212 F
  • Yeast rolls: 190-195 F

Source: Kansas State University Research and Extension

Photo credit: Albertine Watson. Shared under a Creative Commons license (CC BY 2.0).

Photo available for this release:

Photo

Cutline: Raw flour as well as raw eggs can contain dangerous microbes.

Credit: Photo by Albertine Watson. Shared under a Creative Commons license (CC BY 2.0)

Page 1 of 1151