Published in Missouri Gardening

Media contact:
Amber Allen
Field Specialist in Human Development
Southwest HES
Phone: 4178818909
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Story source: Jessica Trussell, 660-646-0811

Join University of Missouri Extension Human Development and Family Science field specialists for 'Boost Your Brain and Memory.' The online class uses a whole-person approach to help you form new habits to boost your brain health, remember things better, be more organized, pay closer attention and regulate your emotions.

Participants receive a downloadable workbook that includes memory exercises, tips on nutrition and exercise, and summaries of evidence-based research on brain health. The aim is to help participants implement new habits to maintain cognitive health while practicing new skills for better memory. Instructors will focus on healthy habits in six areas: heart health, nutrition, physical activity, social engagement, cognitive engagement and stress management.

The workshop will meet via Zoom on eight consecutive Thursdays, July 16 through Sept. 3. The registration fee is $40. Sign up at https://extension2.missouri.edu/events/boost-your-brain-and-memory-via-zoom.

Published in Missouri Gardening

Media contact:
Linda Geist
Writer
University of Missouri Extension
Phone: 573-882-9185
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Story source: David H. Trinklein, 573-882-9631

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Even in the era of COVID-19, Master Gardener learning options continue to grow.

Registration is open for online core training classes through University of Missouri Extension. Classes begin Aug. 23 and run through Dec. 31, said David Trinklein, Missouri Master Gardener program coordinator and MU Extension horticulturist. Trinklein teaches the class with Sarah Denkler, MU Extension regional director for southwestern Missouri.

In the past, those interested in becoming Master Gardeners had to attend weeks of classes. However, traveling to a bricks-and-mortar classroom is not practical for everyone. So online classes were born in 2013.

Using an online learning platform called Canvas, MU Extension horticulturists deliver classes as a series of scripted and narrated PowerPoint presentations.

“With online training, you can do the class work whenever it is convenient for you,” Trinklein said. “It is accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week.”

Topics include basic botany, soils and plant nutrition, vegetable gardening, fruit production, plant propagation, insects, plant diseases, landscape plants, landscape design and pesticide safety.

After each module, students are tested on their understanding of the materials.

“Trainees are expected to achieve a composite score of at least 70 percent on chapter quizzes,” Trinklein said.

“Master Gardener trainees are also required to donate 30 hours of service, helping others learn to grow,” he said. “Local Master Gardener chapters can help online trainees find volunteer positions so they can meet the service hour requirements.”

Once certified, Master Gardeners continue to learn and share.

“You have to continue to educate yourself and to serve the public,” Trinklein said. To maintain certification, Master Gardeners are required to do six hours of continuing education and 20 hours of community service each year.

The registration deadline is Aug. 16. For more information, visit mg.missouri.edu.

Image available for this release:
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Missouri Master Gardener online training banner.

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North American Beaver (Castor Canadensis) Native, semi-aquatic rodent found in southeastern U.S. wetlands. Largest

Media contact:
Curt Wohleber
Writer
University of Missouri Extension
Phone: 573-882-5409
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Story source: Maria Rodriguez Alcala, 417-358-2158

CARTHAGE, Mo. – Farmers and ranchers are increasingly turning to online sales to reach customers, especially with COVID-19 disrupting the operation of many farmers markets, restaurants and stores.

You don’t have to be particularly tech-savvy to launch an online store, but the variety of vendors, platforms and services to choose from can be daunting, and there’s no one-size-fits-all solution, says Maria Rodriguez-Alcala, a University of Missouri Extension community economic development specialist and member of MU Extension’s Food Systems program team.

MU Extension hosted a webinar in June titled “Choosing an Online Platform & Selling Online: Four Missouri Farmers Share Their Success Stories.” MU Extension facilitated the virtual workshop in partnership with the Webb City Farmers Market and the USDA’s Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program.

“This panel really helped illustrate the opportunities and challenges these farmers face when making decisions to expand or diversify their operations,” says Rodriguez-Alcala.

A recording of the farmers’ presentations and question-and-answer sessions is available at youtu.be/1hzweVW2j4E, and the farmers are available for free one-on-one consultations.

“The farmers have committed to a set number of hours through Aug. 30, so people interested in receiving consultation or mentoring should contact the farmer of their choice as soon as possible,” she says.

Curtis Millsap, Millsap Farms, Springfield. The first-generation family farm sells vegetables to farmers markets and restaurants. Members of its Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program receive weekly shares of produce and other items. In his webinar presentation, Millsap compared the pros and cons of two e-commerce platforms designed for farm sales: Harvie and Barn2Door.

Karen Scott, OakWoods Farm, Newton County. This small-scale market farm produces vegetables, herbs, beef, goats, chickens and value-added products. OakWoods sells at farmers markets, its on-farm and online stores, and to local shops and restaurants. Scott says online purchases account for 30% of sales. The farm uses Square Online Store, a service of Square, Inc., the company behind the popular credit card reader for mobile devices. Setting up an online store with Square is free, she says, but it takes a bit of time to learn how to use it effectively.

Greg and Nancy Rasmussen, Sunny Lane Farm, Dade County. The Rasmussens sell grass-fed beef and lamb and pasture-raised poultry and pork at farmers markets and to local stores. Their online store is on Grazecart, an e-commerce platform the Rasmussens say was created by and primarily for ranchers. In their webinar presentation, the Rasmussens also discussed marketing, planning and various practical, financial and legal/regulatory considerations.

Liz Graznak, Happy Hollow Farm, Moniteau County. In addition to operating a CSA, the farm sells at the Columbia Farmers Market and to area stores and restaurants. About 10 years ago, Graznak hired MayeCreate Design, based in Columbia, to develop a custom website for the farm. She worked with the same company recently to add an online store using WooCommerce, a plug-in for the WordPress content management system.

Farmer contact information

  • Curtis Millsap – 417-839-0847, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Karen Scott – 970-980-9395, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Nancy and Greg Rasmussen – 417-637-2991, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Liz Graznak – 573-268-6394, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

“Choosing an Online Platform & Selling Online: Four Missouri Farmers Share Their Success Stories” webinar

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Published in Missouri Gardening

Media contact:
Amber Allen
Field Specialist in Human Development
Southwest HES
Phone: 4178818909
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Greene County - The University of Missouri Extension in Greene County is offering a Matter of Balance workshop. The workshop will meet for eight sessions starting August 6th through September 24th, in a meeting space at the Springfield-Greene County Botanical Center located at 2400 S Scenic Ave in Springfield from 9 am to 11 am.  You must register for the workshop but the program is FREE. To register go to https://extension2.missouri.edu/events/a-matter-of-balance-1593106567 or call 417-881-8909 

Many older adults experience concerns about falling and restrict their activities. A Matter of Balance is an award-winning program designed to manage falls and increase activity levels. You will learn to view falls as controllable; set goals; make changes to reduce fall risks at home; and exercise to increase strength and balance.

University of Missouri Extension programs focus on the high-priority needs of Missourians. Each county extension center, with oversight by locally elected and appointed citizens, is your local link to practical education on almost anything.

Published in Alabama Gardening

There is great news for those who are still looking for work. If current unemployment benefits are exhausted

Published in Alabama Gardening

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Published in Iowa Gardening
Seth Watkins and Rep. Cindy Axne.

Rep. Cindy Axne (IA-03) introduced legislation to rename the U.S. Post Office in Clarinda in honor of Jessie Field Shambaugh, the former school superintendent from Page County and longtime Iowa educator known to many as the "Mother of 4-H." [node:read-more:link]

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