Dec 30, 2010
Published in Yardstead Blog

With 2011 right around the corner, We have spent some time reflecting upon the events of 2010.  This always leads us to making some resolutions for the new year to come. As yardsteaders, we tend to mark time by seasons and we began thinking of resolutions to match the seasons. We didn't want to just go with the typical resolution of "plant more next year".  All the vegetables we plant each year such as zuchinni, heirloom tomatoes, squash, pumpkins, onions, garlic and so on were all popular in my kitchen this year, and we intend to devote more space to these crops next spring. But to be honest, we haven't planned well in years past and we don't have something planted in our garden through each season.  I think in Florida with our climate and mild winters, this is probably almost gardening criminal.  So our New Year's gardening resolution? Plan, Plan, Plan a four-season garden and make more space in the garden to grow more unusual varieties of heirloom vegetables and fruit! 

The Yardstead wishes you much Happiness, Health, and Prosperity in the New Year.  As always Happy Yardsteading to you and your family in 2011!

Apr 24, 2010
Published in Urban Homesteading

Persimmons remind me of my childhood.  It is commonly eaten in homes of asian families.  As my mom is from Taiwan, it was a common fruit that we ate in the fall when it was available.  I was extremely happy to find that it can be grown in our area of the southeast.  According to wikipedia, the persimmon is the edible fruit of a number of species of trees in the genus Diospyros in the ebony wood family (Ebenaceae).  I purchased a non-astrigent cultivar called Fuyu.  I will be planting it shortly (when I find a suitable spot) in our backyard.  This persimmon will add to the growing edible landscaping here at the yardstead.  

Oct 22, 2009
Published in Community Gardens

Community GardenThere has been a lot of coverage in the media lately about community gardens and planting vegetables and fruits on public land.  The Yardstead is in full support of these ideas and we plan to get invloved when we are able.  We will be covering the progress of this movement in detail.  I heard a radio interview yesterday with Darrin Nordahl, the author of a new book Public Produce:  The new Urban Agriculture.  {jumi}<iframe src="http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=theyard-20&o=1&p=8&l=as1&asins=1597265888&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr" style="width:120px;height:240px;" scrolling="no" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" frameborder="0"></iframe>{/jumi}  The book is full of details about public spaces already being used for community gardens such as this community gardens program in Portland, OR.  The book also includes many ideas for using more....