Published in Missouri Gardening

Media contact:
Linda Geist
Writer
University of Missouri Extension
Phone: 573-882-9185
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Story source: Zac Erwin, 660-665-9866

LINNEUS, Mo. – Cattle producers can learn how to extend their winter feed and jump-start spring pasture at a March 12 workshop at the University of Missouri Forage Systems Research Center in Linn County.

MU Extension specialists Zac Erwin and Valerie Tate will tell how to extend dwindling winter feed supplies. Erwin, a field specialist in livestock, says drought caused extreme shortages of forage. He tells producers about feeding options to delay turning out cattle onto pastures to avoid damage to spring grass. Tate gives producers management options to help damaged pastures recover.

The event begins 6 p.m. at 21262 Genoa Road, Linneus.

Contact Tate at 660-895-5123 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to register for the free dinner.

MU Extension and the NRCS + MU Grasslands Project sponsor the event.

Published in Colorado Gardening
Photo Credit:Brandon K.Percival;Northern Cardinal;Audubon112 Annual Christmas Count;Pueblo Reservoir, CO By Linda Langelo, CSU Horticulture Agent, Golden Plains Area How do we care for our fine-feathered friends throughout the year?Here are a few suggestions based on a bird's basic needs:Bird need a diversity of food sources Like any wild animal, birds need shelter Birds need

TX wine industry-fbSource: AgriLife Today

To support the growing Texas wine industry, now the fifth-largest in the U.S., the

Hill Country Land Stewardship Conference-fbSource: AgriLife Today

Whether operating a working ranch or engaging with the general public through tourism

Monthly Lunchtime Horticulture Seminars-fbSource: AgriLife Today

The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service in Bexar County will present a series of

Speaker Lineup Annoounced-fbSource: AgriLife Today

The agenda for the Texas A&M AgriLife Hemphill County Beef Conference April 23-24 is

Published in Missouri Gardening

Media contact:
Linda Geist
Writer
University of Missouri Extension
Phone: 573-882-9185
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Story source: Tim Schnakenberg, 417-357-6812

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Native warm-season grasses can yield more forage than traditional tall fescue, says Tim Schnakenberg, University of Missouri Extension agronomy specialist.

Fans of native-warm season grasses like to use big bluestem, switch grass, Indian grass and eastern gama grass for hay and pastures. The grasses also serve as a wildlife habitat. “These grasses are superior at minimizing fertilizer and lime expense, are highly palatable, and provide a large quantity of forage at needed times,” says Schnakenberg.

Some producers say the cost of establishment outweighs benefits. They report that stands did not develop quickly, or at all. Some stands died out after a few years.

“Tall fescue is the dominant forage in Missouri, and it should be,” Schnakenberg says. “We have an outstanding cow-calf industry because of tall fescue’s palatability, durability, ease of establishment, and fall and winter grazing capability that can majorly offset the expense of feeding hay. However, we miss some huge benefits if we depend solely on fescue.”

Missouri beef producers lose about $160 million yearly in production from the toxic endophyte in Kentucky 31 fescue, he says. Fescue makes good-quality hay in Missouri at key times. But weather and fescue’s natural speed of maturity often mean untimely harvest, resulting in loss of energy and protein.

A growing number of southwestern Missouri farmers are turning to warm-season grasses to complement their fescue fields. “These do not have endophyte issues and can be hayed at more suitable times,” Schnakenberg says. In many cases, these grasses prove more productive than fescue for pasture and hay. One southern Missouri producer averaged 5.3 dry tons of hay per acre from two cuttings on a 2018 big bluestem stand. The stand was part of a demonstration project in cooperation with the NRCS+MU Grasslands Project and the Missouri Department of Conservation.

This is consistent with trials in two other states. A University of Kentucky study found that tall fescue plots averaged 3.1 tons per acre. Native warm-season grass plots averaged 3.9 to 5.3 tons per acre per year, depending on the species. A University of Tennessee study reported that big bluestem plots yielded 5.6 tons per acre using less fertilizer than fescue.

Missouri producers who successfully converted to native grasses credit a chemical, imazapic, commonly found in Plateau and Panoramic herbicides. These products can be used safely, even during the establishment year, on new and old stands of big bluestem and Indian grass. Weed control in the first year leads to a higher success rate.

Once established, stands need care. If used for grazing, use a management-intensive grazing system. Keep post-grazing heights high and move cattle off pastures for rest periods. “Native grasses cannot be managed the same as fescue,” Schnakenberg says. “If someone intends to manage a stand like their fescue stands, we do not recommend considering these grasses.”

For hay, leave a high stubble so carbohydrate storage in the lower stems is not compromised. Contrary to common thinking, this does not lower overall yield.

Schnakenberg recommends that producers make the switch on small acreages to lower risk. Visit the NRCS + MU Grasslands Project website at NRCS-GrasslandsProject.missouri.edu or contact an MU Extension agronomy specialist for more information.

Published in Missouri Gardening

Media contact:
Linda Geist
Writer
University of Missouri Extension
Phone: 573-882-9185
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Story sources: Ryan Milhollin, 573-882-0668; Joe Horner, 573-882-9339

COLUMBIA, Mo. - Registration is open for the University of Missouri Agricultural Lenders School for early career agricultural lenders. The school runs June 3-7 on the MU campus.

The Agricultural Lenders School provides in-depth training in agricultural finance for lenders seeking to make good loan decisions in today's marketplace, says Ryan Milhollin, an MU Extension agricultural economist.

Sessions use practical examples to demonstrate concepts focused on issues critical to successful agricultural lending. Speakers use a balance of presentations, exercises and case studies to provide a quality learning experience, Milhollin says.

Topics include:

• Introduction to agricultural financial statements.

• Keys to agricultural credit analysis.

• Financial benchmarks and comparative data.

• Communicating with farmer clients.

• Practical servicing issues specific to agriculture.

• Emerging issues in agricultural finance.

• Legal review and lien documentation.

• Managing agricultural risks.

• Completing the agricultural loan.

• Farm Service Agency programs and perspectives.

Since 2000, the school has successfully trained more than 500 agricultural lenders from a variety of states and lending institutions, Milhollin says. The $1,250 registration fee covers program materials, lunches and the evening social event. Class size is limited. Milhollin recommends early registration.

Registration deadline is May 3. For more information and registration, go to agebb.missouri.edu/commag/lenderschool, or contact the MU Conference Office at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 573-882-4349.

MU Extension, Missouri Independent Bankers Association and FCS Financial sponsor the event.

Published in Iowa Gardening
morel mushroom by yoderphotography/stock.adobe.com.

A workshop for morel mushroom certification will be offered March 30 and April 6 on the Iowa State campus, Ames. To legally sell morel mushrooms in Iowa, sellers must complete a certification workshop that covers identifying morels and false morels. Registration is $50 per person. Read more about Register Now for Morel Mushroom Certification Workshop

Multi-Media Release: 
201903-morel-mushroom-workshop.mp3
Published in Iowa Gardening
Triticale seed heads by LianeM/stock.adobe.com.

Livestock and row crop producers are invited to learn about Iowa State research findings, Iowa Learning Farm projects and personal experiences from local farmers at the McNay Research Farm workshop March 27. Read more about Cover Crops, Grazing Topics of McNay Research Farm Workshop

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